PG Calc Blog

The latest on planned giving from PG Calc.
Read our posts for comments on the latest topics and issues in planned giving. We hope you find our posts timely and interesting, and we hope you'll share your perspective with us!

UIC Deduction Remains Available after 2017 Tax Act

UIC Deduction Remains Available after 2017 Tax Act

Following the December 2017 passage of the 2017 Tax Act, some in the gift planning community raised the question of whether the 2017 Tax Act’s elimination of miscellaneous itemized deductions extended to the deduction for unrecovered investment in contract (UIC) at the death of the last annuitant of a charitable gift annuity, as that deduction had appeared under the heading “Other Miscellaneous Deductions” on Form 1040 Schedule A. But the 2017 Tax Act only eliminated the miscellaneous deductions subject to the 2% floor, which the UIC deduction was not subject to. The UIC deduction remains available, as is confirmed in the tax forms, instructions, and publications the IRS has issued to reflect the 2017 Tax Act changes for 2018. This deduction equals the total of all tax-free portions of the annuity that have not yet been distributed as of the death of the last annuitant and is taken on the deceased’s final income tax return.

Giving USA Report Brings Good News for Gift Planners

Giving USA Report Brings Good News for Gift Planners

2014 was a record year for philanthropy in the United States, according to the Giving USA 2015 Annual Report.  There was a 7.1% increase in giving dollars over 2013 (5.4% adjusted for inflation).  These numbers signal the return of pre-recession giving patterns. Some experts had predicted it would take 10 years for charitable giving to rise back to pre-recession levels, so the increases are heartening. 

What's the Big Deal about the Donor's Cost Basis?

What's the Big Deal about the Donor's Cost Basis?

The question of why charities need the donor’s cost basis for long-term appreciated stocks funding charitable gift annuities (CGAs) comes up frequently in our client support calls. If the donor doesn’t provide the information up front, do they really need to pursue it? What if the donor says he doesn’t have the cost basis information? Can the charity simply assume zero for the cost basis and call it a day? What difference does it make anyway? Why it matters PG Calc’s Planned Giving Manager prompts the user to supply the dollar amount the donor paid for the stock when it was originally acquired – or, in the case of inherited stocks, the official value of the stock on the date of death of the previous owner (AKA the “stepped-up” cost basis).* This information is relevant and necessary because charitable gift annuities are split-interest gift arrangements. In each CGA, there is a benefit for the charity (the remainder or residuum), and a benefit for the annuitant (the value of the stream of annuity payments over time).

IRD Begets ITRD, the “Other Death Tax”

IRD Begets ITRD, the “Other Death Tax”

Last month I presented a Webinar on taxation basics for gift planners.  Somewhat to my own surprise, when I was preparing the accompanying paper, I found myself covering the topic of income in respect of a decedent (IRD) in the same section as the topic of estate taxes. It’s now several weeks later, and I remain convinced I made the right choice.

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