PG Calc Blog

The latest on planned giving from PG Calc.
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Implications of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021

Yesterday, President Trump signed into law the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, which will provide $900 billion in coronavirus relief and $1.4 trillion to continue to fund the government. The legislation covers a lot of territory and clocks in at over 5,500 pages. Because of the delay in passage and further delay in signing, there is little time before 2020 ends for donors to ask what will be extended and what will be changed for 2021. Below is our reporting of a few key provisions in this law that will impact fundraisers and donors.

2020 is Almost Over (Phew!) and the CARES Act is Expiring

The CARES Act and 2020 Charitable Tax Benefits Legislation known as the CARES Act introduced significant incentives to stimulate charitable giving in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Some of those important tax incentives expire on December 31, 2020. Your donors will need to act quickly to take advantage of these tax-smart ways of giving before they are gone. Listed below are the most significant provisions applicable to charitable giving included in the CARES Act.

Peaks, Valleys, and Life in Between

These are truly historic times. The United States – along with the rest of the world – is in the grips of a pandemic that most of us could never imagine, even in our worst nightmares. At the time of this writing, the deaths within our borders alone are running into tens of thousands, and the global number of cases is now being counted in millions. Most of the country is under some sort of stay-at-home mandate, our economy has basically sputtered to a crawl, and our stock markets appear to be in a continual free-fall. These are desperate times, when everyday Americans are fearful for their lives, and for the safety and well-being of their loved ones. Beyond those immediate concerns, folks are worried about their jobs and the sudden declines in the values of their retirement accounts. How can we presume that donors will think about planned gifts – or charitable gifts of any kind – at a time like this?

Why myRA Won't Be the Next Big Thing in Gifts of Retirement Plan Assets

Why myRA Won't Be the Next Big Thing in Gifts of Retirement Plan Assets

In his State of the Union address in January, President Obama announced his intention to make a new type of Individual Retirement Account (IRA), called a “myRA,” available to certain taxpayers.What does this mean to you in working with planned gift prospects and their advisors? MyRAs would have of the following basic characteristics: MyRAs would be created by the Treasury Department, pursuant to a presidential memorandum dated the day of the address but not actually signed until two days later, whereas existing IRAs are established under the Internal Revenue Code. At least initially, myRAs would be available only to those who work for entities that agree to offer the accounts to their employees. Employers will have some incentive to do this because they would not have to make myRA contributions,